Month: February 2015

Planning!

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Well since we only have about a week to get the first complete draft turned in, I have to be really organized, stay on track of what I need to get done and ask questions if I’m confused or stuck. I changed my question to ‘What is the psychoanalysis of an individual who gets into this lifestyle?’ which in a way summed up all the questions I had on Monday. I’ll need to look up atleast 5 more sources and understand the history of the BDSM lifestyle-like when it first started for example.

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Revised-Dominance

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Anahy Perales

Professor Jaxon

English 130 PI

23 February, 2015

Dominance

One of Freud’s theories intrigued me on the topic of dominance and it made me question a few things. Were women truly submissive? What leads an individual to be submissive or dominant, is it based on personality or does that lifestyle contribute to their personality? Is that how they’d rather live their life or at least a certain part of their life or is it based on how they grew up. Is there a legit psychological reason? Are the majority of dominants male or female? Is it acceptable all around the world or is there more leeway in some parts? I found some interesting articles that kind of answered my questions but most of them were in the sexual aspect of it but that just raised even more questions.

What originated my interest was the third stage of Freud’s Theory, the Phallic Stage. According to Wikipedia, the Phallic Stage has two complexes: Electra and Oedipus. Wiki stated that Oedipus is when the son and father compete for the sexual possession of the mother and is considered superior whereas Electra is when the girl can’t sexually possess the mom which redirects her to desire the father. Girls developed what Freud called “penis envy” which made women inferior, submissive and less confident. Freud came up with this theory around the 1890s and it still seen today even though we have evolved from that time period. I believe this plays in the BDSM lifestyle because of the roles played by both males and females.

From an article called An examination of personality characteristics associated with BDSM orientations, Ali Hebert and Angela Weaver states that “BDSM refers to a range of sexual preferences that generally relate to enjoyment of physical control, psychological control, and/or pain.  It can be broken down into six overarching components: bondage and discipline, domination and submission and sadism and masochism. Bondage and disciple consist of using physical or psychological restraints, domination and submission involve an exchange of power and control, and sadism and masochism refer to taking pleasure in others’ or one’s own pain or humiliation.” The whole idea of BDSM is stigmatized by society just because it’s not ‘normal’ or ‘plain’. But in reality back in the day in the eyes of men, women were supposed to be submissive and follow the husband or the male leader in her family.

Many individuals who are into the BDSM lifestyle have to live with the stigma that goes with this lifestyle.   An article by Ronald Lynn Hopper Jr. called Socialization, Role Attainment and Stigma Management in BDSM tells us that   “The misconception includes beliefs that participants were less educated, had lower incomes, and had a history of childhood sexual abuse. Studies actually found that SM participants did, in fact, have a higher level of education, were in higher income brackets, and were generally well-adjusted members of society when compared to general population.” It also emphasizes on how they identify how some have been introduced to this lifestyle, but also how individuals in the BDSM lifestyle handle the stigma related to this lifestyle on a day-to-day basis. You would think your sexual practices wouldn’t be anyone’s business but this article states that “In the U.S., normative sex is often something assumed to be confined to the bedroom and to encompass a single accepted position-missionary…Participation in BDSM is seen as non-normative by the larger society.”

Since BDSM isn’t socially accepted, members of that lifestyle must be cautious about how they perceive themselves as well as being cautious with personal information they give. Which connects with an article by Beverly L. Stiles and Robert E. Clark called BDSM: a subcultural analysis of sacrifice and delights which  emphasizes how privacy is very important for a participating BDSM member and how they have to sacrifice something’s in order to be seen a ‘normal member of society’. “First, individuals may perceive what would happen if a secret was revealed and they believe the reaction or evaluation would be disapproval. Second, some conceal secrets as a form of defense. That is, they often worry that the recipient would violate their trust. Third, some individuals worry that they will not be able to discuss the secret in satisfactory manner. Fourth, some may simply feel that the secret is not relevant to others.”

The article by Ronald Lynn Hopper Jr. identifies a study that was conducted to see how many individuals get introduced to the BDSM lifestyle “In fact, 61.8% reported their first introduction to SM was through another person…women are more likely to become members of the subculture while participating in an emotion relationship. Clearly, then, new members often are introduced through close intimate personal contacts.” It also mentioned that others would encounter this lifestyle by internet chats and pornography.

Works Cited

An examination of personality characterisitcs associated with BDSM orientations

http://eds.b.ebscohost.com.mantis.csuchico.edu/eds/detail/detail?vid=1&sid=57682bd4-2075-460b-aa91-51c5ccb5aa9b%40sessionmgr112&hid=112&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmU%3d#db=edspmu&AN=edspmu.S2291706314200024

Socialization, Role Attainment and Stigma Management in BDSM

http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/1132/

Wiki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phallic_stage

BDSM: a subcultural analysis of sacrifices and delights

http://eds.b.ebscohost.com.mantis.csuchico.edu/eds/detail/detail?vid=7&sid=57682bd4-2075-460b-aa91-51c5ccb5aa9b%40sessionmgr112&hid=112&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmU%3d#db=sih&AN=57749447

Dominance

Posted on

Anahy Perales

Professor Jaxon

English 130 PI

16 February 2015

Dominance

I was intrigued with the topic of dominance when I was reading one of Freud’s theories and it made me question a few things. Were women truly submissive? What leads an individual to be submissive or dominant, is it based on personality? Is that how they’d rather live their life or at least a certain part of their life or is it based on how they grew up. Is there a legit psychological reason? Are the majority of dominants male or female? Is it acceptable all around the world or is there more leeway in some parts? I found some interesting articles that kind of answered my questions but most of it was in the sexual aspect of it but that just raised even more questions.

What originated my interest was the third stage of Freud’s Theory, the Phallic Stage. A quick sum from wiki was that there are two complexes: Electra and Oedipus. Wiki stated that Oedipus is when the son and father compete for the sexual possession of the mother and is considered superior whereas Electra is when the girl can’t sexually possess the mom which redirects her to desire the father. Girls developed what Freud called “penis envy” which made women inferior, submissive and less confident. Freud came up with this theory around the 1890s and it still seen today even though we have evolved from that time period. I believe this plays in the BDSM lifestyle because of the roles played by both males and females.

From an article called An examination of personality characteristics associated with BDSM orientations by Ali Hebert and Angela Weaver, BDSM has 6 components which are broken down as bondage/discipline, domination/submission, and sadism/masochism. They have some differences like bondage and discipline is more of physical or psychological restraint where domination and submission is more power and control and lastly sadism and masochism is about taking pleasure in others or one’s own pain or humiliation. This whole idea of BDSM is stigmatized by society. Individuals think that people who participate in this lifestyle are sick and must be psychologically disturbed. But why should someone’s sex life feel like a taboo? They are stigmatized misconceptions that we as individuals in society live by.  There were various researches that Herbert and Weaver pointed out that showed the differences between BDSM members and a non-BDSM members. Surprisingly enough in a lot of areas it showed the BDSM member was in better condition than a non-BDSM member.

Another article by Ronald Lynn Hopper Jr. called Socialization, Role Attainment and Stigma Management in BDSM emphasizes on how they identify to the roles of the BDSM lifestyle but also how individuals in the BDSM lifestyle handle the stigma related to this lifestyle. You would think your sexual practices wouldn’t be anyone’s business but this article states that society has imposed that the “normative sex” in the United States should be confined to the bedroom only and that there shouldn’t be any kinks.  Like I previously said why someone sex life feel like a taboo or a dirty secret? Some misconceptions that this article stated was that individuals who practiced BDSM had lower income, were less educated, were sexually abused in their childhood but in reality they had a higher level of education, had a higher income and were well-adjusted members of society compared to those who didn’t have this lifestyle. Does this mean that individuals participating in the BDSM lifestyle hold themselves by a higher standard so they don’t have to deal with the stigma associated to their particular sexual lifestyle? This article briefly states that because BDSM isn’t socially accepted, members of that lifestyle must be cautious about how they perceive themselves as well as being cautious with personal information they give.

In the article by Beverly L. Stiles and Robert E. Clark called BDSM: a subcultural analysis of sacrifice and delights, it emphasizes how privacy is very important for a participating BDSM member and gives 4 main reason of why they keep the information confidential. One main reason that Stiles and Clark state is that members of the BDSM believe that the reaction to that secret would be disapproval, a second reason is that it would be used a sense of defense, a third reason would be that BDSM members wouldn’t be able to successfully describe how their specific sexual activity or relationship is satisfactory to them, and the last reason would be that their secret isn’t relevant to others. I find it intriguing on how individuals who are in the BDSM lifestyle manage to go on with their life’s keeping an important part of themselves a secret. Life is about indulging yourself with things you love and enjoy but if you’re doing it in secrecy how is that fulfilling?

All these sources intertwine with each other in some way or another. Stiles and Clark give 4 reasons of why privacy is important and how the first reason is based on stigma which Hopper Jr. emphasizes on and how the participating BDSM individuals respond to that stigma. One of those stigmas that Hopper Jr. emphasized was that society thought BDSM individual’s where sick, psychologically which connects to the article by Hebert and Weaver who described the 6 components of BDSM and how they work but also some research regarding their personality and characteristics.

Works Cited

An examination of personality characterisitcs associated with BDSM orientations

http://eds.b.ebscohost.com.mantis.csuchico.edu/eds/detail/detail?vid=1&sid=57682bd4-2075-460b-aa91-51c5ccb5aa9b%40sessionmgr112&hid=112&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmU%3d#db=edspmu&AN=edspmu.S2291706314200024

Socialization, Role Attainment and Stigma Management in BDSM

http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/theses/1132/

BDSM: a subcultural analysis of sacrifices and delights

http://eds.b.ebscohost.com.mantis.csuchico.edu/eds/detail/detail?vid=7&sid=57682bd4-2075-460b-aa91-51c5ccb5aa9b%40sessionmgr112&hid=112&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmU%3d#db=sih&AN=57749447

Does the art you see in the street stretch your mind or slap you in the face?

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 I’m going in a different direction with this blog.

I’ve always seen some form of art or graffiti where ever I’ve went, either on the ground, on the wall, on a train, or on a bridge.

The reoccurring question that comes in mind is, Is graffiti vandalism or art?  

My personal opinion is that if it’s just tagging then yes its vandalism, if it’s more than just putting your name on it then its art. Where you put is something a totally different thing though!

Picture

I’d  much rather see a wall like the one on the right than the one on the left. The world is full of white and black already. Wouldn’t you want to see some vibrant colors in your gloomy day?  What would you prefer?

This following source from GraffitiActionHero.org listed 8 differences between graffiti tagging and street art that I had never thought about. It made me think about what I’ve encountered in my life and how I’ve perceived it. Did it adorn the urban landscape or did it scar and accelerate urban decay? Did it tak skill or did it take balls? 

http://www.graffitiactionhero.org/graffiti-tag-vs-street-art.html

This other source showed at least 9 different types of street art you normally wouldn’t recognize or acknowledge that it’s art.

http://artradarjournal.com/2010/01/21/what-is-street-art-vandalism-graffiti-or-public-art-part-i/

  After 3 members of the FUNK graffiti crew died, the other members of the FUNK crew decided to write an article about the relationship between graffiti and art education.  There were about 3 questions that this article tackled: Are graffiti writers artist? What are the risks and dangers involved in the creation of graffiti art? What should art educators know about graffiti?

“Graffiti can contribute positively to community building and promote unity, providing a sense of belonging and membership for youth. Graffiti culture provides a source of male mentorship and brotherhood that is otherwise missing from the lives of many writers.”

If you teach children the art of graffiti, should there be an age limit? If children were taught boundaries when they were introduced to graffiti, would it still contribute to delinquency?

http://eds.b.ebscohost.com.mantis.csuchico.edu/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=ea37eb87-499b-44fc-8321-e21b855e64d2%40sessionmgr198&vid=3&hid=119